Trade

José Carlos Casado, Trade, 2014

Trade, the name itself illustrating an exchange. It could be quite possibly an exchange of vitality, material, life, or even freedom. Scattered bunches of aluminum is positioned as an assemblage of people. It appears as an assembly line of people standing up for themselves, their rights and passage.

José Carlos Casado created this piece to reflect his experience travelling through the archipelago of Svalbard located in the Artic Circle. He watched as the natural environment was being demolished in means of profit. Exploiting its resources for monetary gains, he forces you to examine how our selfish conquests impact the world we live in.

 

Trade stands in a site that is analogous to Casado’s understanding of worldly neglect.

Fatefully resonating in a courtyard of a prison, where with little life resources, one is still confronted with the violent acts done upon humanity.

The labeled description for this piece states,

“Casado exposes uncomfortable realities about how violence and terrorism enable the creation of what we trade in exchange for things we want, whether that is luxury and beauty or political power.”

Rather than exterminate life resources, the destruction and dehumanizing nature of prison absorbs all that is luxurious or beautiful. The prisoner once sought these same luxuries. In some form or another, they each went in search for their desires. Their reasons may differ but their conquests were similar. Now imprisoned in a place where their individuality and freedom are taken from them, it is now a fight for power within in a politically charged system that is prison.

Wanting to demonstrate this exchange of life, this site is the precise location of life and death. Even those living are entrapped in this divergent atmosphere of declined freedom. You will be able to live, but the life you live will be like not living at all. In exchange for your crime, you are now forced to spend your time idling away in a cell.

 

WASTE OF LIFE.

Relating the torrential force of nature to the violent destruction of human bodies, Casado portrays the waste of life. Placed in the courtyard of Castle Williams, a former prison, Casado uses materials that exalt the measured exploitation of life resources. Just like any prisoner admitted to Williams Castle, the body of man exploits itself. Because of his immoral behavior he commits,

 

the body, mind and soul of the individual is now corroded.

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    A soldier drenched in resin crouches in what appears to be mid attack. Preparing for battle, it aims its weapon towards the threat. Who is the perpetrator? Who is the enemy? We each will have a different answer. The prisoner might say the guards, the soldier will say the opposing side and the free individual may say the system.  When the wind hits these sculptures, you begin hearing this eerie rattling noise. It sounds empty, lifeless and hopeless. It fills the area with acclamation of space. There is so much space but so little freedom. Entrapped, like the hollow figures that lie on the ground.  Of what system do we each belong to ?  Of whose fault lie our problems ?  In this world what the protagonists and antagonists in life ?   Casado creates  Trade  to inform us of our misuse of the land we live on, while simultaneously speaking of the abuses we impede on ourselves.

A soldier drenched in resin crouches in what appears to be mid attack. Preparing for battle, it aims its weapon towards the threat. Who is the perpetrator? Who is the enemy? We each will have a different answer. The prisoner might say the guards, the soldier will say the opposing side and the free individual may say the system.

When the wind hits these sculptures, you begin hearing this eerie rattling noise. It sounds empty, lifeless and hopeless. It fills the area with acclamation of space. There is so much space but so little freedom. Entrapped, like the hollow figures that lie on the ground.

Of what system do we each belong to? Of whose fault lie our problems? In this world what the protagonists and antagonists in life?

Casado creates Trade to inform us of our misuse of the land we live on, while simultaneously speaking of the abuses we impede on ourselves.

Jasmine BootheComment